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Wolfsburg Home of VW 2014
(Jun 13, 2014)
The castle "Wolfsburg" was first mentioned in 1302 in a document as the domicile of the noble lineage of Bartensleben. Originally a keep next to the Aller, it was protected by a moat some centuries later. In 1372 the first documentary reference to the Burg Neuhaus (castle of Neuhaus) near Wolfsburg appeared. After the extinction of the Bartensleben line in 1742 the property and its Schloss Wolfsburg (Wolfsburg Castle) was passed on to the Earls of the Schulenburg. The communal manor was an important employer for the nearby settlements Rothenfelde and Heßlingen.
Some of today's urban districts, including Heßlingen, used to belong to the Duke of Magdeburg during the 18th century. In 1932 these districts were detached from the Prussian province Saxony and integrated in the administrative district of Lüneburg belonging to Hannover.
Other urban districts, like Vorsfelde and the villages transferred to Wolfsburg from the county of Helmstedt, belonged to the later Duke of Braunschweig (Brunswick) for centuries. Fallersleben and other villages belonged to the Electorate of Braunschweig - Lüneburg or the Kingdom of Hanover.
Wolfsburg was founded on 1 July 1938 as the Stadt des KdF-Wagens bei Fallersleben (English: City of the KdF Car at Fallersleben), a planned town centred around the village of Fallersleben, built to house workers of the Volkswagen (people's car) factories erected to assemble what was to become the Volkswagen Beetle.
During World War II military cars, aeroplanes and other military equipment was built there, mainly by forced workers and POWs at these factories.[citation needed] Though postwar Beetle production ended in Wolfsburg in 1978, the factories remain a key part of Volkswagen's production capacity.
At the urge of the British occupying power the city was renamed as Wolfsburg on 25 May 1945, after the eponymous castle located there. Ironically, 'Wolf' was Adolf Hitler's nickname amongst his closest colleagues and is also found in 'The Wolf's Lair' and his sister's adopted name. In 1951, Wolfsburg was separated from the District of Gifhorn, and became an urban district.
In 1955 the one-millionth VW Beetle was manufactured in Wolfsburg. During the years of the German economic miracle Wolfsburg experienced a large influx of immigrant workers, especially from Italy. In 1958 the city hall was inaugurated. In 1960 the Volkswagenwerk GmbH (limited partnership with a limited liability) was changed into an AG (public limited company).
In the course of a land reform in Lower Saxony in 1972, 20 localities were suburbanized to the city through the so-called "Wolfsburg-Act". Thus the population exceeded 100,000 and so Wolfsburg gained the status of major city with nearly 131,000 inhabitants. The expanse of the city grew from 35 to nearly 204 square kilometers. For the new suburbanized districts eleven directly voted councils with a mayor each were established. In 1973 the highest population of the city was reached with a number of 135,000.
With the A39, the city got a direct highway junction as a side road of the A2 (Oberhausen - Hannover - Werder) in 1982 and in 1988 the city became a university location for the University of Applied ScienceBraunschweig/ Wolfenbüttel(today: Ostfalia University of Applied Science) established a facility.
As a launch promotion for the 5th generation of the Volkswagen Golf the city of Wolfsburg welcomed visitors on the internet, on the official stationery and on every city limit sign with the name "Golfsburg" from 25 August to 10 October 2003. This campaign gained the nationwide attention of press, radio and TV broadcasting.
In the summer of 2009, Wolfsburg gained nationwide attention when their football team, VfL Wolfsburg, won the German football league. A party was celebrated in the city centre with about 100,000 people and was a first in the history of the city.
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Braunschweig 2014
(Jun 13, 2014)
A city, of Lower Saxony Land (state), northern Germany, on the Oker River, some 38 miles (60 km) southeast of Hannover. Legend says that it was founded about 861 by Bruno, son of Duke Ludolf of Saxony, but it probably originated at a much later date. It was chartered and improved by Henry the Lion, duke of Saxony, in the 12th century and became a leading member of the Hanseatic League in the 13th century; it later declined as a result of civil and external discords.
The constant partitions of the Braunschweig territories, and the quarrels of its separate lines of princes prevented Braunschweig from playing a great part in German politics. After the Peace of Westphalia in 1648, Braunschweig began to be wholly overshadowed by the power of Brandenburg and its successor, Prussia.
After 1806, Braunschweig was included by Napoleon in the Kingdom of Westphalia, but in 1814, it was restored to its legitimate ruler, Duke Frederick William, who fell at Quatre Bras in 1815.
During the minority of his son, Charles II, the duchy was ruled by George, prince regent of Great Britain. (There was a House of Brunswick, the English name for Braunschweig, named for this royal line.) On coming of age, Duke Charles made himself very unpopular, and during the revolutionary upheaval of 1830, was forced to leave the country permanently. His brother William, who was formally proclaimed his successor in 1831, proved to be an able and popular ruler. He remained in charge until his death October 18, 1884.
An early supporter of the Reformed faith, Braunschweig belonged to the Protestant League of Schmalkalden. It was capital of the duchy of Brunswick before 1918 and of the Land of the same name until incorporated into the new Land of Lower Saxony in 1945.
Captured by Allied forces in 1945 after suffering heavy damage, it has been rebuilt.
Surviving medieval buildings include the 12th-century Romanesque Cathedral of St. Blasius, which contains the tombs of the founder, Henry the Lion, and his English consort, Matilda; in the vault are the tombs of the Guelf rulers of the Brunswick line from 1681. Other surviving medieval churches include St. Martin's, St. Katherine's, St. Andreas', and St. Aegidien's.
The Burg Dankwarderode, a castle containing the Treasure of the Guelfs, dates from the 12th century; on the castle square (Burgplatz) is the bronze Lion Monument (L”wendenkmal), emblem of Braunschweig, carved in 1166 as a symbol of Henry the Lion. Also notable are the old town hall (14th-15th century), the Renaissance Cloth Merchants' Hall (Gewandhaus), and the Richmond Palace, built in 1768-69 by Prince Charles William Ferdinand, son of Charles I of Brunswick.

The population of Lower Saxony regards itself as Lower German, linked by a common ancient Saxon origin and use of the Lower German dialect known as Plattdeutsch. The latter, a dialect closely related to Dutch, Frisian, and English, is quite distinct from the official High German.
Some regional literature is still produced in this form, and it remains the language of the home in much of the state. This feeling of cultural unity helps to bind together such diverse areas as the parts of ancient Hanover east of the Weser, the younger regions of Braunschweig, Emsland, Osnabruck, and South Oldenburg (which were formerly under Westphalian influence), and the Frisian portions of northern Oldenburg and Ostfriesland. About four-fifths of the population is Protestant, with a Roman Catholic minority in the state's western part.
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Baron Georg, LLC Sauce Production 2013
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Wietze October 2012
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Celle (Findelhof) Flomart
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Wietze Herbstfest 2012
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Hamburg July 2012
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Wietze Schützenfest 2012
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